Mark Twain November Biography from 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910

Mark Twain November Biography from 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910
Mark Twain November Biography from 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910

Mark Twain November Biography from 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910

Mark Twain is an outstanding American writer, journalist, and public figure. His work covers many genres – realism, romanticism, humor, satire, philosophical fiction, journalism, etc., and in all these genres he invariably takes the position of a humanist and democrat. Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens) was born November 30, 1835, in a small town in Florida (Missouri, USA). When Sam was still a child, the family moved to the city of Hannibal (in the same place, in Missouri) in search of a better life.

 In 1864, Mark Twain moved to San Francisco, California, where he began writing for several newspapers at the same time. In 1865, Twain’s first literary success came, his humorous story “The Famous Jumping Frog of Calaveras” was reprinted throughout the country and called “the best work of humorous literature created in America to this point.” In the spring of 1866, Twain was sent by the Sacramento Union newspaper to Hawaii. 

During the journey, he had to write letters about his adventures. After the resounding success of the letters, Colonel John McComb, publisher of the Alta California newspaper, invited Twain to tour the state, giving exciting lectures. The lectures immediately became wildly popular, and Twain traveled all over the state, entertaining the audience and collecting a dollar from each listener.

 In 1893, Twain was introduced to the oil tycoon Henry Rogers, one of the directors of the Standard Oil Company. Rogers helped Twain to profitably reorganize his financial affairs, and the two became close friends. Twain often visited Rogers, they drank and played poker. We can say that Twain even became a family member of Rogers. 

The sudden death of Rogers in 1909 deeply shocked Twain. Although Mark Twain repeatedly publicly thanked Rogers for saving him from financial ruin, it became clear that their friendship was mutually beneficial. Apparently, Twain significantly influenced the softening of the tough temper of the oil magnate, who had the nickname “Cerberus Rogers.” After the death of Rogers, his papers showed that friendship with the famous writer made a real philanthropist and philanthropist out of a ruthless miser.

 Mark Twain died April 21, 1910.

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